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Press Roundup: Márki-Zay Supports Same Sex Marriage

Hungary Today 2021.11.29.

A Christian conservative and a liberal commentator try to make sense of the opposition frontrunner’s controversial statements on Christian values and secular politics.

Hungarian press roundup by budapost.eu

Background information: in an interview with the BBC, opposition frontrunner Péter Márki-Zay said that as a devout Christian, he supports the secular state that grants equal rights to everyone, and recognizes secular gay marriage as well as abortion rights. He added that churches should be liberated from politics so that they can focus on their genuine objectives and values.

On Meg van írva blog, Calvinist Pastor László Köntös interprets Péter Márki-Zay’s statement as an effort to transform Christian teaching by adapting it to progressive values. Köntös recalls that until now, Christians in Hungary have usually supported sovereigntist and traditionalist values. Márki-Zay’s Christianity is akin to interpretations by progressive elites that want to co-opt Christianity rather than eliminate it, he sugests. The liberal reinterpretation and appropriation of Christian values is intended to change the mentality of Christians and transform them into supporters of liberal progressive politics. At the end of the day, progressive reinterpretations of Christianity will destroy the foundational values and institutions of religion, Köntös concludes.

Telex’s Attila Rovó wonders if Márki-Zay’s strategy to woo Christian voters will succeed. The liberal commentator recalls that Márki-Zay has repeatedly pledged to keep the border fence and stop illegal migration, while also maintaining that he as a Christian person cannot regard abortion as legitimate. At the same time, Márki-Zay always underscores that these are his own personal views grounded in his Christian faith and do not determine his public political commitments. Rovó wonders if the opposition frontrunner can be successful in his dual ambition to win over Christian voters who are dissatisfied with PM Orbán’s politics while not alienating non-religious voters.

Featured photo illustration via Péter Márki-Zay’s Facebook page