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Instead of Compulsory Vaccination, State Transport Companies to Give Vaccinated Workers Extra Days Off

Hungary Today 2021.11.09.

State railway company MÁV and state coach bus firm Volán will provide two extra days off for all employees who get the coronavirus vaccination until November 30th, according to an agreement made between the trade unions and employers.

Two weeks ago the government made a U-turn regarding vaccination and provided employers with the right to make it compulsory. After this, trade unions of Hungary’s most important public transport companies warned that in case of the introduction of compulsory vaccination in their companies, services would probably have to be shut down altogether. They said that even before a decision was made by employers, there was a massive outcry among workers about the potential introduction of obligatory inoculation. The trade unions argued that increasing the willingness to vaccinate could be better achieved by other, softer means like giving extra days off or some kind of bonus or reward.

Now, both state railway company MÁV and state coach bus firm Volán decided against making vaccination mandatory, but are using rewards to persuade hesitant employees to get vaccinated.

These two extra days off, due to the “responsible decision” of the employees, can be taken next year, according to the statement. Anyone is eligible who has already received or will receive an inoculation until November 30, 2021 (the deadline in the government’s decree).

Fearing employee shortages and going against workers’ basic rights, not one larger company is known to have introduced the mandate. Teachers, on the other hand, will undergo the special ruling, similar to healthcare employees.

Despite Request from Unions, Mandatory Vaccination for Teachers Remains
Despite Request from Unions, Mandatory Vaccination for Teachers Remains

Teachers' unions believe that the introduction of compulsory shots could lead to further movement of the workforce in a sector already facing a serious employee shortage.Continue reading

featured image illustration via Péter Komka/MTI