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Zengővárkony’s Egg Museum Showcases Egg Art From All Over the World

Ábrahám Vass 2019.04.22.

Eggs – which symbolize life, rebirth and fertility – are an integral part of the folk traditions surrounding Easter. For example, Hungarian women typically gift men an egg in exchange for being “sprinkled” (locsolás) with perfumed water. Staying true to tradition, the Arts on Eggs Museum (Míves Tojás Gyűjtemény) in Zengővárkony has amassed an impressive, varied collection of eggs from all around the world.

Aside from being a long-standing tradition, egg painting has recently emerged as an autonomous art form. The museum, which turns 19 this year, showcases a diverse and rich collection of folk art applied to eggs by local folk artists from different regions. The majority of the eggs on display come from Europe, primarily the Carpathian Basin. However, there are pieces which represent other diverse countries, such as Israel, China and Indonesia.

Image by MTI/ Tamás Sóki

In total, 2400 pieces are on display, complemented by the same amount kept in storage. Those currently exhibited come from 55 regions from 19 countries and were made by 160 designers, using over 30 different techniques. Open all year round, the museum reportedly welcomes around 11,000 visitors per year. In addition, it also regularly offers classes, egg painting competitions, guided tours and other cultural events.

Image by Míves Tojás Gyűjtemény- Facebook

The Arts on Eggs Museum’s location, Zengővárkony, a village famous for preserving traditions, is just 17 km from Pécs on Route 6. This makes it a perfect day trip from Pécs or at least a short stopover on the way. In addition, the museum itself is a traditional rural house. Not that you need further persuasion, but the village and the spectacular Zengő Mountain are well worth a visit on their own.

Image by MTI/Tamás Sóki

For more information, you can visit the museum’s site. For more photos, check out the museum’s Facebook page.

featured image via MTI/ Tamás Sóki