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Week in the Life of the Hungarian Diaspora: Easter Celebrations Around the Globe

Fanni Kaszás 2019.04.18.

As part of our regular Week in the Life of the Hungarian Diaspora series, we have collected some of the many celebrations and preparations for Easter, the greatest Christian celebration, the resurrection of Jesus Christ. You can read about the Easter workshops and dance houses organized by the Kőrösi Csoma Sándor Program, which targets Hungarians outside the Carpathian Basin, and the Petőfi Sándor Program, which focuses on dispersed Hungarian communities beyond the borders of Hungary.

Easter-themed Hungarian Festival in Florida

This year, the fifth annual Hungarian Festival took place in Port Orange, Florida, on the first weekend of April. In addition to Hungarian folk traditions related to Easter, the all-day event also featured the typical elements of Hungarian gastronomy and culture. Nearly 1600 people attended and enjoyed stuffed cabbage, chicken paprika, goulash soup and lángos prepared by Hungarians from the Daytona Beach area. The art and crafts workshops also followed the Easter theme: participants created traditional, colorful Easter eggs with íróka. The Hungarian room prepared by recipients of the Kőrösi scholarship was also a great success. There, famous Hungarians, inventors, folk art objects and clothes were presented. The Hungarian Bon-Bon band performed its most popular songs at the festival.

Easter preparation at the Geneva Hungarian School and Kindergarten

On 10 April, the Geneva Hungarian School and Kindergarten invited children to come and take part in a variety of Easter-themed activities. Aside from egg painting, dancing and searching for chocolate eggs, the children also learned several traditional craft techniques. The greatest success, of course, was the traditional egg-painting with íróka. They were also given the option to make a basket with rabbit motifs. With the help of the adults, the older children fashioned bunnies out of old socks, and the smallest decorated paper eggs. After the DIY-session, everyone sang, danced and participated in the traditional ‘sprinkling.’ The program ended with a chocolate egg hunt, which was clearly the most memorable part for the kids. In addition to the permanent members, more than 15 families participated in the event.

Easter in the Swedish Hungarian Diaspora

The Kőrösi Scholarship recipients visited Hungarians living in several Swedish cities, including Göteborg, Boras, Jonkoping Ljungby and Halmstad while on an ‘Easter tour’ in celebration of the holiday. During the first half of the program, the Hungarian children learned the Biblical origin of Easter. Afterward, they eagerly watched the scholarship recipients’ performance of a fable about egg painting and sprinkling. The show was followed by arts and crafts sessions: using various traditional techniques, the participants painted their own Easter eggs. The program ended with an exciting chocolate egg and bunny hunt.

Easter preparation in Magyarpéterfalva

Magyarpéterfalva held its third annual Easter arts and crafts workshop and dance house on the 15th of April. After the workshops concluded, the children of Bethlenszentmiklós performed a play for the audience. The program then continued with a dance house wherein children and parents learned Moldavian dances. The event ended with a performance by the Hungarian Piros Pántlikás folklore band.

Easter workshop in Tiszakálmánfa

The Tiszakálmánfalva Petőfi Sándor Cultural Association held its annual handicraft Easter workshop once again, attracting visitors from several cities and villages in Vojvodina. Together with the Árvácska handicraft team and the Mladost Serbian cultural association in Tiszakálmánfalva, a total of 14 groups participated. They learned each other’s techniques, shared their finished creations and taught the children the basics of their crafts. The day ended with a performance by the Gubancolók Girls’ Choir of folk songs from Somogy.

featured photo: National Salon 2018, Kunsthalle (Tamás Komporday / Hungary Today)