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Romanian University Considers Launching Hungarian-Language Programmes In Medicine And Pharmaceutics

Ferenc Sullivan 2015.08.04.

The University of Oradea, located in the Romanian city near the border with Hungary which has a substantial ethnic Hungarian minority, is considering launching Hungarian-language programmes in medicine and pharmaceutics, according to the Hungarian-language Romanian news site Transidex.ro.

Citing a report published in the Bihoreanul newspaper, the article writes that the university’s Faculty of Medicine and Pharmaceutics easily fills its annual target of 500 admitted students – partly because it holds admission examinations after the entrance exams of Transylvanian universities offering similar programmes take place – and the institution has decided to increase its number of students, targeting Hungarian students living on both sides of the Romanian border.

Entrance exams held at the Faculty, which was founded in 1991, last week produced a 7:1 oversubscription rate for the 195 state-funded places offered, while a further 485 will have to settle the costs of their education privately. According to the article, the Faculty’s dean Florian Bodog has been considering this possibility to increase the number of students for over a year and Hungarian-language tuition could start in the autumn semester of 2016 at the earliest. Currently, the university is examining the possibilities of launching a Hungarian-language programme with a minimum of 50 students, Mr. Bodog said. The university has a total of 21 000 students.

Through cooperation with Hungarian medical universities in Debrecen, Szeged and Budapest, the Oradea faculty already has Hungarian professors and the University of Szeged has already offered to provide help to launch the Hungarian-language programme in medicine.

via transidex.ro
photo: irodalom.lapunk.hu

The city of Oradea (Nagyvárad in Hungarian) is a major political and cultural centre of Romania’s 1.2 million-strong ethnic Hungarian community, with around one in four of its 196 000 inhabitants belonging to the Hungarian minority.