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PM Orbán's Political Courage Praised At Conference

Ferenc Sullivan 2015.02.11.

From his very first public utterance, the political credo of Prime Minister Viktor Orbán has revolved around courage, while his actions have become the thorn in the side of those who want to preserve the status quo; namely  those who protect their privileges, Mária Schmidt, head of the House of  Terror Museum, said at a conference organised by the 21st Century Institute.
“Strategic thinking, thorough consideration, decision, action, stubborn persistence and perseverance; but above all, courage,” said Ms. Schmidt, describing Orbán’s “credo”. The critics are dismayed because “precisely in their time of office it has been necessary to confront the fact that the West  appears to have stalled after 300 years of continuous progress and growth,” the historian said.
Whereas liberal democracy shows symptoms of crisis they seek to conceal, new power-centres have appeared which “dictate the pace and direction of their steps.” The reason why the prime minister is attacked is because it is thought that his actions – of which there are followers abroad – create precedents. It needs bravery to say that in the 21st century there is no significance to the traditional divisions of left and right. The viable parts of right and left must be rolled together if the conservative people’s party is to create modern valid policies amid new circumstances, Ms.  Schmidt said.
Orbán turned his back of the “meaningless meta-language” of the West. “Instead, he invites his students to think because he thinks; he has questions for which he seeks answers,” she said, creating panic among western leaders “who are not politicians but political managers; rather than choosing between good and bad answers, they use the language of political correctness”, she concluded.
Following the official programme, the historian responded to news website Mandiner.hu’s question on why the government, described by her as successful and popular, had lost over half a million votes by 2014 and a further several hundreds of thousands since then, according to public opinion polls. In Ms. Schmidt’s opinion, many Fidesz supporters stayed at home on the day of elections because they were convinced of a Fidesz victory and thus deemed it unimportant to cast their votes, while in the case of others, the general attitude of being critical of the government can be perceived; however, as long as they do not vote for opposition parties, this cannot be regarded as rejecting the cabinet.
via hungarymatters.hu and mandiner.hu
photo: hir24.hu


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