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Nigel Farage: Orbán Represents the Future of Europe

Gábor Sarnyai 2019.02.15.

Nigel Farage, one of the loudest Euro-skeptics in the EP and the main orchestrator of Brexit, has given an interview to Válaszonline.hu. Nigel Farage became widely known in Hungary for defending Viktor Orbán during the EP debates on the state of rule of law in Hungary. He repeatedly compares Brussels and the Soviet Union, and his visions of the European Union fit comfortably with Fidesz’s “freedom fighter” rhetoric.

He thinks Hungarians are still as oppressed as they were 30 years ago:

I can assure you when you go into Article 7 procedures, you effectively are not free people.”

Farage often set democratic values against the centralized bureaucratic European Union. He has built his political movement on claims that the top institutions of the EU are not elected by the people and, therefore, don’t have the authority to act on the citizens’ behalf.

This is why Farage praises politicians like Viktor Orbán and Greece’s Yanis Varoufakis. He said

Orbán actually believes in things. He does not sheepishly, slavishly go along with the European project as he firmly believes in the concept of the nation-state. He clearly is a strong defender of, as he sees, the Hungarian culture and is not afraid to say and do these things despite huge criticism from the European Union.”

Farage also doesn’t see a threat in the transformation of the juridical system or the often cited erosion of the free press. As he put it:

I just do not see [distortion of democracy] as being true, as far as the judiciary is concerned. There is a lot of Communism alive in Hungary and all over the former Soviet bloc.”

Farage also agrees with Viktor Orbán and Fidesz accusing George Soros of interfering in European Politics: “I agree completely of course; his influence is all across the Western democracies.”

He believes that “Europe is going to become much less focused on the EU and Brussels and more focused on the nation states and national interest. This is the whole drift and change of politics in Europe. God knows why [Orbán] comes here so often. It makes him more popular at home I think. He comes, gets abused by everybody, then goes back and it helps his rating.”

In response to being asked if he sees Orbán as a “little authoritarian monster”, Farage replied that he doesn’t: “He represents the future of Europe.”

featured photo by europarl.europa.eu