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Trianon 100 – Kövér: Hungary Regained Its Prestige Thanks to Past 10 Years Achievements

MTI-Hungary Today 2020.08.18.

On the 100th anniversary of the Trianon treaty, it can be said that Hungary has regained its prestige thanks to its achievements over the past ten years, László Kövér, the speaker of parliament, said in a public radio interview on Tuesday. Accordingly, leaders in the region now see that “success in the future cannot be at each other’s expense”, he added.

As a consequence of the Treaty of Trianon, drafted at the Paris Peace Conference and signed in Versailles on June 4, 1920, Hungary lost two-thirds of its territory.

Orbán at Trianon 100 Event: "Hungary is Winning Again"
Orbán at Trianon 100 Event:

Prime Minister Viktor Orbán said Hungary is “winning again” in a speech at the inauguration of a monument in Sátoraljaújhely, in the northeast of the country, to mark the 100th anniversary of the Trianon Peace Treaty on Saturday. The Prime Minister said, there is not a single nation in the world that could have endured […]Continue reading

The year 2020 has been declared Year of National Unity “not only to commemorate the tragedy of Trianon but to celebrate the country’s survival over the past hundred years in spite of it,” the Fidesz politician said.

The intention of the Trianon treaty’s drafters — a not especially secret one – was to sentence the country to death as a state and as a nation; to wipe it off the face of the earth”

Kövér said Hungarian literature, film and theatre over the past 30 years had not dealt with what happened a hundred years ago widely enough in the public arena.

Trianon: Instead of the principle on self-determination of nations, the victorious great powers re-drew borders according to their geopolitical interests – Interview with historian Balázs Ablonczy
Trianon: Instead of the principle on self-determination of nations, the victorious great powers re-drew borders according to their geopolitical interests – Interview with historian Balázs Ablonczy

Hungary can only be held responsible for World War I as any other participating country, says historian Balázs Ablonczy, whose new book, “Unknown Trianon,” has just been published. On the other hand, the bad perception of Hungary in the world at the time played a role in that the treaty hit the country particularly hard. […]Continue reading

He also said external pressures such as “the wave of migrants” now threatened “our identity” but at the same time this had reinvigorated Visegrád cooperation. The Visegrad Group is once again cooperating in defensive and constructive ways, and this may form the basis for even broader central European cooperation in the future, he added.

Featured photo by Szilárd Koszticsák/MTI