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The European Parliament has passed the EU digital COVID Certificate Regulations with 546 votes to 93, and 51 abstentions. The immunity certificate will be issued free of charge by national authorities and will be available in either digital or paper format with a QR code. The purpose of the certification is to ensure travel and economic recovery in the European Union.

The system of the so-called EU “green certificate” will be in place from 1 July 2021 until 1 July 2022. It will exempt its holder from quarantine, entry restrictions and testing. Member states can only impose restrictions if they are necessary and “proportionate to safeguard public health.”

Hungary's Immunity Certificate App to Be Upgraded for EU Green Card Use
Hungary's Immunity Certificate App to Be Upgraded for EU Green Card Use

In order to become eligible for the European Union’s Digital COVID Certificate on time, Hungary’s immunity certificate application will include the type of vaccine used and the time that the holder’s second inoculation occurred, by June 15, Gergely Gulyás announced.  The Minister of the Prime Minister’s Office is confident that Hungarians will have “near-total freedom […]Continue reading

All personal data must be processed according to the General Data Protection Regulation of the European Union, and certificates will be verified offline with no personal data being retained.

Three different types of certificates will be available to those who have either had a negative Covid test, those who have recovered from the virus recently, or those who have been inoculated with a vaccine authorized by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). All member states can decide whether they will accept non-EMA approved vaccines.

Unfortunately for those Hungarians who have been vaccinated with either Sinopharm or Sputnik V, unless they show a negative Covid test or recovery from the virus, they will face restrictions if their destination country does not accept non-EMA approved vaccines.

DK Calls on Govt to Pay for PCR Tests Required for Travels by Recipients of Eastern Jabs
DK Calls on Govt to Pay for PCR Tests Required for Travels by Recipients of Eastern Jabs

The opposition Democratic Coalition (DK) has called on the government to cover the cost of PCR tests for Hungarians who wish to travel abroad but were inoculated with coronavirus vaccines that are not approved in European Union countries. Zoltán Varga, spokesman of DK’s parliamentary group, noted that his party had warned the government repeatedly of […]Continue reading

While uncertainty remains for such individuals, Hungary is continuing bilateral deals to allow quarantine-free travel to various countries with any Hungarian immunity certificate, these include:

In the European Union:

  • Cyprus
  • Czechia
  • Croatia
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia

Outside of the European Union:

  • Bahrein
  • North Macedonia
  • Georgia
  • Moldova
  • Mongolia
  • Montenegro
  • Serbia
  • Turkey

Furthermore, Hungary will have access to payed Covid testing kits for those Hungarian citizens who use the EU immunity certificate. These will be covered by the EUR 100 million which the Commission promised to set aside from the Emergency Support Instrument.

Juan Fernando López Aguilar, Chair of the Civil Liberties Committee, said that the EU immunity certificate has set the pace “to restore free movement and a fully functional Schengen while we continue to fight this pandemic.” He encouraged EU states not to impose further restrictions unless necessary.

FM Szijjártó: Romania Lifts Entry Restrictions for Travelers from Hungary
FM Szijjártó: Romania Lifts Entry Restrictions for Travelers from Hungary

Entrants from Hungary are no longer required to stay in isolation in Romania or present negative Covid tests when travelling there, Foreign Minister Péter Szijjártó said on Friday. Romania’s decision to list Hungary as a safe country is yet another achievement of Hungary’s vaccination drive, the minister said on Facebook. Given the upcoming pilgrimage in […]Continue reading

The regulations will still need to be formally adopted by the European Council and published in the Official Journal before they enter force on 1 July 2021.

Featured photo illustration by Zoltán Balogh/MTI