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Budapest tested the immunity of 1,500 people in elderly care homes and homeless shelters, finding that almost all those who were tested have enough antibodies for protection, and elderly care homes have developed herd immunity thanks to vaccination, reports hvg.hu.

The capital conducted the study on 1,500 people working or living in elderly care homes and homeless shelters, finding that “98.9 percent of vaccinated people have enough antibodies for ensuring protection, while closed off elderly care homes have practically developed herd immunity.”

PMO Head: Life to Return to Normal by Early Summer
PMO Head: Life to Return to Normal by Early Summer

All Hungarians above the age of 18 will have received at least the first dose of the coronavirus vaccine by the end of May, and life can return to normal in late May or early June at the latest, Gergely Gulyás, the prime minister’s chief of staff, said. In an interview published by pro-government Figyelő […]Continue reading

573 elders and 841 workers were tested in care homes, and 116 people were tested in homeless shelters. Around two-thirds of them had been vaccinated, either with Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna’s vaccine.

The study found, if the total amount of people in elderly care homes are included with the 992 vaccinated people of the study, that 93 percent of all employees in care homes are immune. It is because of the lack of immunity in the remaining 7 percent that Covid protocols must be maintained. This is considered to be herd immunity since, while the virus may turn up, it will not have a significant impact on the community.

Another interesting finding was that significantly fewer antibodies were found in most of those who were not vaccinated but had recovered from the virus, although they still had enough for immunity. Having more antibodies does not directly correlate to being more immune, since there are several other factors that come into play as well.

Senior Infectologist: Protections Still Needed Despite High Vaccination Rate
Senior Infectologist: Protections Still Needed Despite High Vaccination Rate

Notwithstanding the fast pace of vaccinations in Hungary, maximum effort should be made to prevent a potential fourth wave, a top infectologist of the South-Pest Central Hospital said on Saturday. János Szlávik warned that the British variant was spreading fast among younger people, and he called on the public to adhere to mask-wearing and social […]Continue reading

The study emphasized that it is not representative of the entire population. It should also be noted that while this test looked at immunity to Covid through antibodies, there is also evidence of vaccines providing immunity through the B cells and T cells of the body.

It is currently unknown how long immunity remains following vaccination, and because of this the study stated that the reduction of antibodies must be observed closely. This will determine whether further inoculations are required.

Featured photo illustration by Attila Balázs/MTI