Movies
Budapest, 2017. március 5.
A legjobb játékfilmnek járó díjat elnyert alkotás, A martfûi rém címû film stábja az elismerés átadása után a 2. Magyar Filmdíj gálaestjén a fõvárosi Vígszínházban 2017. március 5-én.
MTI Fotó: Balogh Zoltán

‘Strangled’ Named Best Feature Film At Hungarian Film Week Gala – Trailer!

“Strangled”, a film based on the real story of a murder in post-1956 Hungary, won Best Feature Film at the closing gala of the Hungarian Film Week on Sunday.

Budapest, 2017. március 5. Sopsits Árpád, a legjobb játékfilmnek járó díjat elnyert alkotás, A martfûi rém címû film rendezõje (j) az elismerés átadása után a 2. Magyar Filmdíj gálaestjén a fõvárosi Vígszínházban 2017. március 5-én. MTI Fotó: Balogh Zoltán
‘Strangled’ director Árpád Sopsits speaking at the closing gala of the Hungarian Film Week (photo: Zoltán Balogh – MTI)

The award-winning film is based on the story of the bloody murder of a woman in 1957 and the investigation obstructed by the Communist regime in post-revolution Hungary. Director Árpád Sopsits’ film was awarded in 9 categories, including Best Leading Actress for Zsófia Szamosi who also appears in Oscar-winning short film Sing. “Sing” was awarded Best Short Film at the Hungarian Film Week too.

Film industry commissioner expects further successes

Hungary’s film subsidy system needed to be fixed, and the country’s film industry is now enjoying the benefits of the new system, Andrew Vajna, the government’s film industry commissioner, told public radio on Sunday. The current film subsidy system had to be “built up from the ruins” of the previous one, Vajna told Kossuth Radio. There had been so many problems “surrounding films” that the previous system had to be scrapped, he insisted.

Vajna said the new subsidy system, however, “turned out to be very transparent”, adding that under the new system, film industry players were fully aware of where subsidies were going. On the topic of popular genres, Vajna expressed his desire to see new Hungarian historical films. He added at the same time that he considered the Oscar-winning Holocaust drama Son of Saul, and Freedom, Love, a film set during the 1956 anti-Soviet uprising, which Vajna produced, as well as Kincsem, an upcoming film about the iconic Hungarian race horse, to be historical films.

Andrew Vajna said he expected Kincsem, Budapest Noir and Pappa Pia to attract wide audiences this summer.

via MTI; cover photo: Zoltán Balogh – MTI