Masterpieces Of Organic Architecture: Photo Collection Of The Art Of Imre Makovecz

Imre Makovecz (Nov. 20, 1935-Sept. 27, 2011), was a Hungarian architect active in Europe from the late 1950s onward. Makovecz was one of the most prominent proponents of organic architecture. As such, his buildings attempt to work with the natural surroundings rather than triumph over them. Frank Lloyd Wright and Rudolf Steiner are both strong influences, as is traditional Hungarian art. 


His work began as a critique of communist ideology and the brutal uniformity of system building but, after the fall of the Communist regime in 1989, it became a comment on the nature of globalization and corporate culture. In his attempts to refer to and build on Hungarian national archetypes, Makovecz was continuing the work and ideas of the architects of Hungarian Art Nouveau and National Romanticism.

Imre Makovecz received nearly a hundred awards and prizes, just to mention some of them: Kossuth Prize, Academie d’Architecture, Grand Medaille d’or (gold medal from the French Academy) and Order of Merit of the Hungarian Republic, Commander’s Cross with Star (for the Hungarian Pavilion at the Seville Expo).

It is impossible to rank a top list of his works, so we have collected a list about some of his most amazing works and buildings.

The Greek Catholic church of Csenger


  The Bus Terminal Of Makó


Árpád Vezér Secondary School Of Sárospatak


Pázmány Péter Catholic Uinversity In Piliscsaba


…and the magical Bibliotheca of the University


The Bath (Hagymatikum) of Makó


This community center complex represents the final making of peace between two peoples (Swabians from Germany and the Transylvanian Szeklers) in Kakasd.


Front door of the Gubsci Villa in Budapest


Puskás Academy and Pancho Aréna of Felcsút


Puskás Ferenc ÍLabdarúgó Akadémia, Felcsút, Pancho Aréna