Foreign Affairs

Israel’s New Ambassador to Hungary Presents Credentials to President János Áder

Yesterday, Israel’s new Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Yossi Amrani, presented his credentials to Hungarian President János Áder. The presentation of credentials to a country’s head of state is a formal, ceremonial act that signifies the new ambassador’s role as official representative of his country, and of the host country’s acceptance of his status as such.

The meeting took place in the Sánor Palace, the official residence of the President of the Republic of Hungary. Following the ceremony, Ambassador Amrani gave a short speech, in which he stressed his desire to maintain and build relationships between Israel and Hungary. He added that the two countries “are tied together by history and by Hungary’s Jewish heritage, as well as by the two countries’ responsibility to protect peace, security, stability, and welfare in their regions and throughout the world.”

Continuing, Mr. Amrani discussed the legacy of the Holocaust in Hungary, saying that this tragedy “must always be in our memory and in our conscience,” and added that history should not act as “a restriction, but rather as a moral and political compass.”

The Ambassador discussed his wish to increase academic and scientific exchange programs and to improve economic cooperation between Israel and Hungary.

Mr. Amrani emphasized that Hungary and Israel are “excellent members of the international community,” and added the two nations share strategic views on international issues.

Ambassador Amrani, who has been involved in Israeli foreign policy since the 1980s. His most recent posting was as a senior official in Israel’s Foreign Ministry; prior to that, he served as Israel’s Ambassador to Croatia from 2012 to 2014.

The presentation of credentials was Mr. Amrani’s first official act since his arrival to Budapest; the second followed shortly after, when the Israeli Ambassador and his staff visited the Shoes on the Danube Bank, a Holocaust memorial commemorating those people, mostly Budapest Jews, who were murdered by the Hungarian Fascist Arrow Cross Party during the Second World War.

Via MTI, Hungary Matters, and the Israeli Embassy in Budapest

Image via MTI