Science

Intel’s Legendary Hungarian-American CEO Andy Grove Dies Aged 79

Andy Grove, the Hungarian-American who turned Intel into the world’s leading chip manufacturing company, has died at the age of seventy-nine, the Hungarian state news agency MTI reports, citing the US company’s Tuesday morning statement.

While the cause of his death has not yet been disclosed, the Silicon Valley pioneer had been known to suffer from Parkinson’s Disease. Voted Man of the Year in 1997 by Time Magazine, he has been hailed as one of the business world’s most revered leaders who helped to usher in today’s era of computing.

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Andy Grove was born András István Gróf in Budapest in 1936 to a merchant family of Jewish descent. He emigrated to the United States after the 1956 Hungarian Revolution was crushed by the Soviets, where he continued his studies as a chemical engineer. In 1968, he and two associates founded Intel Corporation, which has since developed into the world’s largest semi-conductor manufacturer.

Beginning from 1979, Mr. Grove led the company for more than two decades as chairman and then as CEO, remaining chairman of the board of directors until 2005. Since then, he had been contributing to Intel as a senior advisor.

The entire tech world as taken to social media to mourn his death, with Apple CEO Tim Cook writing on Twitter:

Andy Grove was one of the giants of the technology world. He loved our country and epitomized America at its best. Rest in peace.

via index.hu
photo: Bloomberg/Europress/Getty