ArtsCulture

Hungarian Artists to Be Featured At Upcoming Venice Biennale, the ‘Olympics’ of the Art World

According to Hungarian wire service MTI, for the first time in several decades, Hungarian works of art will be featured in the central exhibition of the Venice Biennale this year.

At a press briefing yesterday, organizers said that, starting on May 13th, visitors to the Biennale will be able to view the works of Hungarian artists Tibor Hajas and Attila Csörgő as in the famous art festival’s central display.

Tibor Csörgő, Hemisphere, one of five C-prints, 30 x 24 cm each, 1996 (Image: gregorpodnar.com)
Tibor Csörgő, Hemisphere, one of five C-prints, 30 x 24 cm each, 1996 (Image: gregorpodnar.com)

The Venice Biennale, which is sometimes referred to as the ‘Olympics’ of the art world, is held, as its name suggests, every other year. Since its foundation in 1895, the Biennale di Venezia has attracted the world’s best and most talented artists. In addition to the central exhibition, countries throughout the world are invited to set up pavilions in Venice to showcase the artistic talent of their respective homelands.

At this year’s Biennale, which is the 57th incarnation of the art exhibition, the Hungarian pavilion will host the work of Gyula Várnai, according to state secretary for culture Péter Hoppál. The pavilion, curated by Zsolt Petrányi, is to be titled “Peace on Earth!”

Petrányi said that the installation would be a reconstruction of a giant neon sign reading “Békét a világnak!” (Peace on Earth!), which crowned the highest building of central Hungary’s Dunaújváros, a “socialist model city” built during the Communist era. He added that other works in the pavilion draw inspiration from the science-fiction culture of the 1960s and ‘70s to address current issues and dilemmas.

This year’s Biennale, officially entitled Viva Arte Viva! (Long live the living arts!), will be open to the public until November 26th. In total, 85 countries will participate in the event.

According to State Secretary Hoppál, Hungary’s participation will cost a total of 76.8 million forints (EUR 246,230).

You can view additional images of the work of Hajas and Csörgő, as well as the work of Gyula Várnai that will be featured in the Hungarian pavilion, below:

Gyula Várnai, Rainbow, 2013-2017 installation (8000 pieces of vintage metal pins), 150 x 800 cm
Gyula Várnai, Rainbow, 2013-2017 installation (8000 pieces of vintage metal pins), 150 x 800 cm (Image: varnaigyula.hu)
varnai rainbow close
Gyula Várnai, Rainbow (Close-up), 2013-2017 installation (8000 pieces of vintage metal pins), 150 x 800 cm (Image: varnaigyula.hu)
Gyula Várnai, Invisible Cities, 2017 Four-channel video.installation, sound (Image:varnaigyula.hu)
Gyula Várnai, Invisible Cities, 2017 Four-channel video.installation, sound (Image: varnaigyula.hu)
Gyula Várnai 5 minutes, 2017 installation (metal structure: 300 x 550 x 150 cm; two-channel video-loop) (Image: varnaigyula.hu)
Gyula Várnai 5 minutes, 2017 installation (metal structure: 300 x 550 x 150 cm; two-channel video-loop) (Image: varnaigyula.hu)
Csörgõ Attila Secession, Wien / Óramû/ Kinetikus szerkezet 2011 (image: artmap.com)
Attila Csörgő, Secession, Wien / Óramû/ Kinetikus szerkezet 2011 (Image: artportal.hu)
Attila Csörgő. Magnet Spring, 1991. Glass, magnets, string. 100 x 100 x 100 cm
Attila Csörgő. Magnet Spring, 1991. Glass, magnets, string. 100 x 100 x 100 cm (Image: artmap.com)
Tibor Hajas, Letter to my Friend in Paris (Levél barátomnak Párizsba), 1975 (Image: artic.edu)
Tibor Hajas, Letter to my Friend in Paris (Levél barátomnak Párizsba), 1975 (Image: artic.edu)
Tibor Hajas, Felületkínzás III (fossziliák - részlet), 1978 (Image: artpool.hu)
Tibor Hajas, Felületkínzás III (fossziliák – részlet), 1978 (Image: artpool.hu)

Via MTI, Hungary Matters, and labiennale.org

Images via varnaigyula.hu, artmap.com, gregorpodnar.com, artportal.hu, artpool.hu, and artic.edu